.

The Sheldon's Horse Timeline Project

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION IN CONNECTICUT

George Washington's Cavalry, the 2nd Continental Light Dragoons

Sheldon's Horse (black text flush left) and General Washington's Headquarters (gray indented text)


|

1776 |

1777 |

1778 |

1779 |

1780 |

1781 |

1782 |

1783 |


|

1776 |

1777 |

1778 |

1779 |

1780 |

1781 |

1782 |

1783 |

1776 "Gentlemen of True Spirits"

Date Event
March 1776 To prepare for the coming campaign, Tallmadge set up a large circular tent for the breaking and training of the horses at Wethersfield. Fewer than forty horses had arrived and with so few, little could be done toward training the Regiment as a whole.
d1e261
March 1776 General Washington repeatedly pressed Sheldon to bring the Regiment to camp, during spring, though Sheldon could not 'hasten' production.
d1e267
April 1776 There was complaint against Sheldon by member of church parish for breach of Sabbath, yet it was suspended.
d1e167
April 04, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Dedham, Massachusetts
d1e6006
April 05, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Providence, Rhode Island Stephen Hopkins' House
d1e6011
April 08, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Norwich, Connecticut Leffingwell Inn (still standing), Jedidiah Huntington's House
d1e6016
April 09, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New London, Connecticut Nathaniel Shaw's Mansion
d1e6022
April 10, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Old Lyme, Connecticut John McCurdy's House
d1e6027
April 11, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fairfield, Connecticut Samuel Penfield's Tavern
d1e6032
April 12, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Westchester County, New York Guion's Tavern
d1e6037
April 13, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New York City William Smith's
d1e6042
April 17, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New York, New York Abraham Mortier's
d1e6047
May 1776 The Connecticut Assembly organized militia horse troops into regiments of light horse. Sheldon was given command of the 5th Regiment and promoted to major. Soon after, his regiment and others, served under Washington at New York which lasted seven days.
d1e196
May 22, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to On Road south through New Jersey, with a stop at Princeton
d1e6053
May 23, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Philadelphia
d1e6058
June 1776 General Sir William Howe had ploddingly pursued Washington from Long Island to White Plains and finally across New Jersey.
d1e100
June 1776 Benjamin Tallmadge becomes Adjutant of Chester's Connecticut Regiment. As Brigade Major of Wadsworth's Brigade, he was one of the last to evacuate Long Island after that fateful battle.
d1e251
June 05, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Brunswick, New Jersey Minnie Van Voorhee's Tavern
d1e6063
June 06, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New York City Abraham Mortier's
d1e6068
June 16, 1776 General Washington calls first dragoons to camp as his patience is nearly exhausted. Only 16 men report to Peekskill.
d1e271
June 17, 1776 Washington calls dragoons to camp even if armed, accoutred or not.
d1e276
June 21, 1776 Upon Washington's orders, Tallmadge departs Wethersfield on dapple grey horses with three other troops, however they are undermanned and underequipped.
d1e284
July 1776 Colonel Thomas Seymour of the Connecticut Light Horse submitted claims for service in New York which the paymaster declined to honor. Seeking more information, Washington questioned Sheldon, who had commanded one of the regiments on that abortive tour of duty. Sheldon replied that he knew nothing of the terms on which they were ordered to New York. Further, he said that he had let Seymour know that he would never make any demands upon the public for his service. Indeed, he was of the opinion that the Light Horse was indebted to their country for quitting their service in so scandalous a manner. Washington was forced to defer a decision until such time as he could get his papers together.
d1e1489
August 28, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Brooklyn Heights, Long Island, New York
d1e6073
August 30, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to New York City Abraham Mortier's or Mott's Tavern & Robert Murray's
d1e6078
September 1776 De Vernejoux appointed captain by brevet.
d1e401
September 15, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Harlem Heights, New York Roger Morris's Mansion (Morris-Jumel Mansion)
d1e6084
October 1776 Affairs at New York worsened and Sheldon's regiment took the field once more.
d1e206
October 1776 In the retreat across New Jersey, Sheldon gained the approbation of George Washington and is nominated to command one of the new Continental cavalry regiments.
d1e208
October 20, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Mile Square, Westchester County, New York Valentine's Hill
d1e6089
October 23, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to White Plains, New York Jacob Purdy's House
d1e6094
October 28, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to White Plains, New York Elijah Miller's House
d1e6099
November 11, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Peekskill, New York
d1e6104
November 13, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fort Lee, New Jersey
d1e6109
November 18, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Hackensack, New Jersey Peter Zabriskie's
d1e6115
November 21, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Passaic, New Jersey
d1e6120
November 23, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Newark, New Jersey Eagle Tavern
d1e6125
November 29, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Brunswick, New Jersey
d1e6130
December 02, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Princeton, New Jersey
d1e6135
December 03, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Trenton, New Jersey
d1e6140
December 08, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Trenton Falls on the Delaware River, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Thomas Barclay's Summerseat
d1e6146
December 11, 1776 Establishment of Sheldon's Horse Dragoons: General Washington proposed the establishment of one or more corps of horse and recommends Major Elisha Sheldon as Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of a regiment. Sheldon's Connecticut Light Horse had served him well during the recent campaign. Congress speedily appointed Sheldon Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of a regiment of Continental cavalry.
d1e108
December 14, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to 10 miles above Trenton Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania William Keith's House (destroyed by fire in the 1980s)
d1e6151
December 16, 1776 Washington orders Sheldon's immediately to go to Connecticut to raise the regiment.
d1e216
December 16, 1776 Samuel Blagden appointed as Major of regiment, Josiah Stoddard of Salisbury appointed as Captain of regiment. Both had served in the Ticonderoga expedition.
d1e218
December 16, 1776 Other Connecticut officers were Captain Benjamin Tallmadge and Lieutenants Ezeldel Belden and John Webb of Wethersfield, Captain Epaphras Bull and Lieutenant Thomas Y. Seymour of Hartford. Two troop commanders came from other states: Captain William Barnett of New Jersey and Captain Nathaniel Crafts of Massachusetts. The sixth captain, Jean de Vemejoux, was a French volunteer. Most of the men, however, came from Connecticut. Most were farmers, but other occupations were also represented.
d1e220
December 20, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Upper Wakefield Township, Pennsylvania William Keith's
d1e6156
December 24, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Upper ford of the Delaware, Pennsylvania Thompson-Neely House
d1e6161
December 25, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Victory at Trenton, New Jersey
d1e6166
December 26, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Newtown, Pennsylvania Hannah Stewart (Mrs. John) Harris' House
d1e6171
December 30, 1776 George Washington's headquarters moves to Trenton, New Jersey John Barnes' (loyalist)
d1e6177

1777 FIRST BLOOD

Date Event
January 03, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Victory at Princeton, New Jersey
d1e6182
January 04, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pluckamin, New Jersey
d1e6187
January 06, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Morristown, New Jersey Arnold's Tavern
d1e6192
May 1777 Elisha Smith joined Second Dragoons, after action at Trenton.
d1e1424
May 29, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Middlebrook, New Jersey
d1e6197
June 23, 1777 The squadron departed Litchfield for army headquaters in Morristown, New Jersey, crossing the Hudson at King's Ferry on the way.
d1e319
June 24, 1777 Tallmadge reported to the Commander-in-Chiet at Middlebrook. Washington ordered the squadron on to his command post, reviewed the troops and commended their appearance.
d1e328
June 25, 1777 At Middlebrook, the senior cavalry officer present was Colonel Theodorick Bland, a medical doctor educated in England, who espoused the Patriot cause upon his return to his native Virginia.
d1e341
June 25, 1777 Colonel Theodorick Bland mustered about 260 light horse. Supported by 300 infantry, the American cavalry moved to reconnoiter the British at Brunswick. About nine miles in advance of the main American force, Bland found a large body of British regulars deployed on Strawberry Hill near Amboy. After some fruitless maneuvering and the loss of a few men and horses, Bland ordered a withdrawal, during which they captured and brought off one Hessian. In a satiric letter, Tallmadge criticized Bland's drawing up the troops within range of the British muskets but beyond that of the American carbines.
d1e346
June 25, 1777 Retiring six miles, Colonel Theodorick Bland halted for the night.
d1e357
June 25, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Quibbletown, New Jersey H.P. Drake House
d1e6202
June 26, 1777 The next morning, the troops had just saddled up, when an enemy column appeared about 100 rods off. Hastily mounting, the Continentals scampered for camp to deploy behind Stirling's infantry. In the ensuing engagement, Stirling lost three cannon to the Redcoats.
d1e362
June 26, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Middlebrook, New Jersey
d1e6208
June 30, 1777 Howe departed for Staten Island, after this small success, though accomplishing very little.
d1e367
July 02, 1777 Sheldon's Horse was parceled out to the divisions. At least one troop was east of the Hudson. In a chatty letter, composed during the relative quiet following Howe's evacuation of New Jersey, Tallmadge wrote that Captain Bull was at Peekskill. Other troops were elsewhere. One was with General Sullivan at Pompton.
d1e375
July 03, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Morristown, New Jersey
d1e6213
July 08, 1777 A courtmartial was ordered there to try de Vernejoux.
d1e388
July 11, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pompton, New Jersey Arent Schuyler's house
d1e6218
July 13, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pompton Plains, New Jersey Van Aulen's
d1e6223
July 15, 1777 Washington moved his divisions towards the Hudson Highlands, in the belief that Howe would try a thrust northward. Twenty of Sheldon's Dragoons were detailed on to advance on roads agreeable to the orders of General Maxwell. As the week progressed, Washington began to have doubts as to Howe's destination.
d1e430
July 15, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Suffern's Tavern, New York
d1e6228
July 20, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Smith's Clove, New York
d1e6233
July 21, 1777 Washington ordered Colonel Theodorick Bland's Horse to return to Bound Brook to actively seek intelligence of the enemy's movement, since as the week progressed, Washington began to have doubts as to Howe's destination.
d1e438
July 21, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to 11 Miles in the Clove Galloway's
d1e6239
July 23, 1777 Sir William sailed south from Sandy Hook and Washington was shifting his army to counter any move along the seaboard.
d1e460
July 23, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Ramapo, New Jersey
d1e6244
July 24, 1777 Sheldon was ordered to report to Washington at Ramapo, leaving one troop with Putnam.
d1e443
July 25, 1777 Colonel Samuel Webb's journal notes that Sheldon's regiment was to return with Sullivan's and Stirling's divisions across the Hudson to New Jersey.
d1e452
July 25, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pompton Plains, New Jersey
d1e6249
July 26, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Near Morristown, New Jersey Mondevil's House
d1e6254
July 28, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Flemington, New Jersey
d1e6259
July 31, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Coryell's Ferry, New Jersey Holcombe House
d1e6264
August 01, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Chester, Pennsylvania
d1e6270
August 02, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Philadelphia Colo. Henry Hill's at Roxboro on 4 August
d1e6275
August 06, 1777 Sheldon was appointed president of a courtmartial to sit at Roxboro, Pennsylvania. He was with his regimental headquarters in that area, while some of his troops were deployed elsewhere. Bull's troop was still east of the Hudson near Peekskill.
d1e468
August 06, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Germantown, Pennsylvania
d1e6280
August 07, 1777 General Putnam directed Webb's regiment and the troop of Sheldon's Light Dragoons to muster. At this time, four dragoons were reported missing. Captain Bamett's troop was then attached to General Sullivan in eastern New Jersey.
d1e476
August 07, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Schuylkill Falls, Pennsylvania
d1e6285
August 09, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Germantown, Pennsylvania
d1e6290
August 10, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Neshaminy Camp near Hartsville, Pennsylvania Moland House
d1e6295
August 19, 1777 Captain Bamett's troop was then attached to General Sullivan in eastern New Jersey. Governor William Livingston complained that no person was more guilty of abusing the privilege of flags to the British lines than was Barnett. He accused the captain of being a drunkard with little discretion even when sober, and he suspected him of disaffection for the American cause.
d1e486
August 19, 1777 Washington reluctantly complied with a Congressional directive to send a troop of horse to serve with General Gates. De Vemejoux's troop had been detached to the Northern Army.
d1e496
August 20, 1777 In Bucks County, Sheldon sent to Gates at Albany an arrest order for de Vernejoux and requested a courtmartial for the Gallic adventurer. The charges were serious. At Rhinebeck, he had allegedly turned a woman out of her bed to make lodgings for himself, and he had threatened to kill the woman with his sword. At Staatsburgh, he was alleged to have dismounted one of his dragoons and to have hitched the horse to the carriage of a Doctor Bards. and to have taken it to Albany, contrary to orders and his certified word of honor. Lastly, he was accused of abusive language to, and threats against, Colonel Sheldon. Witnesses were Lieutenant Seymour and Quartermaster Sergeant Wetmore of his troop and a Doctor Stoddard.
d1e501
August 21, 1777 The balance of Sheldon's Horse had been attached to Stirling's division. Washington's order of battle for August 23 placed the Regiment on the left wing.
d1e545
August 22, 1777 Another detachment of Second Light Dragoons under Lieutenant Colonel Blagden swept through Westchester taking cows, oxen, and horses from the enemy near Fort Independence.
d1e518
August 23, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Germantown, Pennsylvania Stenton
d1e6301
August 24, 1777 For the march through Philadelphia, Bland's and Baylor's regiments led the column, while Sheldon's and Moylan's brought up the rear. The march through the city took more than two hours, after which the army proceeded to Derby
d1e557
August 25, 1777 In the morning, two divisions and the horse moved toward Wilmington.
d1e566
August 25, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Wilmington, Delaware 303 West Street
d1e6306
August 26, 1777 Washington, with all the cavalry except Sheldon's, reconnoitered to within two miles of Howe's camp at Head of Elk.
d1e572
August 27, 1777 The Troop with Gates was tested under fire during this in a strength report. Lieutenant Seymour noted that one man had been killed and three men wounded in a skirmish with Tories and Indians at Schoharie. The wounded were in the hospital at Albany. Seymour also listed two deserters, but whether they had run from the enemy or had simply tired of soldiering he did not state. De Vernejoux was reported absent, sick at Albany, while Sergeant Wetmore with the drill sergeant and two men were absent by command of the Captain. Another man sent as an express to Peekskill by De Vernejoux was still absent. One corporal and four men, though expected hourly, had never joined the troop. Trumpeter John Conley was present sick. These losses and absences left Seymour with one comet, four corporals, and fourteen privates present and fit for duty. Six of their twenty-one horses were unfit. A note on the report stated that most of the horses were much worn down by hard service.
d1e590
August 28, 1777 To celebrate the sale of this loot, Putnam authorized Blagden's dragoons to fire their pieces at retreat.
d1e526
August 28, 1777 Blagden's dragoons, less Captain Bull's troop, were recalled to the main army near Wilmington.
d1e534
August 28, 1777 Sheldon's Horse was advanced to the White Clay Creek area and put under Greene's command.
d1e580
September 01, 1777 General Sullivan reported Livingston's complaint against Captain Barnett to Washington
d1e605
September 01, 1777 Moylan's Fourth Regiment wore red uniforms when Washington ordered fifty of them on a mission to confuse the Loyalists and British spies.
d1e830
September 05, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Port and Wilmington, Delaware
d1e6311
September 07, 1777 General Sullivan advised the Governor that the accused officer would be recalled from the area. The order was written by Washington's aide, Robert H. Harrison.
d1e609
September 07, 1777 Barnett was peremptorily directed to repair to headquarters with all his men, horses, and accoutrement without delay, on pain of being tried and dismissed for disobedience to orders.
d1e610
September 10, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Chadd's ford, Pennsylvania Benjamin Ring's House
d1e6316
September 11, 1777 Defeat at Brandywine. This was reportedly due, in part, to a shortage of light horse and poor reconnaissance.
d1e632
September 11, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Battle of Brandywine, Pennsylvania Now Brandywine Battlefield Park
d1e6321
September 12, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Derby, Pennsylvania
d1e6326
September 13, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Schuylkill Falls and Germantown, Pennsylvania Col. Henry Hill's House
d1e6332
September 15, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Buck's Tavern, Pennsylvania
d1e6337
September 16, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Near White Horse Tavern, Pennsylvania Randall Malin's
d1e6342
September 17, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Yellow Springs & Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania Pottsgrove Manor/Red Lion Tavern
d1e6347
September 18, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Warwick Furnace, Pennsylvania
d1e6352
September 19, 1777 In the post-battle maneuvering along the Schuylldll northwest of Philadelphia, Washington sent General Wayne's division with four field pieces to lie near the enemy rear. Serving with Wayne was Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Temple of Bland's Virginia Horse. His cavalry task force included a detachment under Captain Josiah Stoddard.
d1e637
September 19, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Parker's ford, Pennsylvania
d1e6357
September 21, 1777 Stoddard had a horse piquette well advanced on the Swede's Ford Road to guard the main body at Paoli. The piquette challenged an advancing body of men. Despite getting the proper password, Stoddard was uneasy. He fired his pistol and attempted to stem the rush of General 'No Flint' Grey's silent Redcoats. The chilling efficiency of the British regular was not to be denied. In short minutes, British steel cut down fifty Americans, wounded and captured a hundred more, and routed the rest, Stoddard with them.
d1e642
September 21, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania Pottsgrove Manor
d1e6363
September 22, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Camp 28 miles from Philadelphia on Reading Road Mr. Kennedy's House
d1e6368
September 22, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Camp 34 miles from Philadelphia on the Schuylkill William Artes' House
d1e6373
September 26, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pottsgrove & Yellow Springs, Pennsylvania Henry Keely's
d1e6378
September 27, 1777 Americans had been maneuvered out of Philadelphia. Washington gathered his forces twenty miles from the city and prepared an ambitious attack against the enemy encamped at Germantown.
d1e652
September 27, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pennypacker's Mill, Pennsylvania Pennypacker's Mansion
d1e6383
September 30, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Shippack, Pennsylvania Peter Wentz's
d1e6388
October 02, 1777 Brigadier General Count Casimir Pulaski, now the Commander of the Horse, was directed to assemble all cavalry, except that on necessary duty, as near headquarters as possible.
d1e657
October 04, 1777 Washington planned for four columns to make a coordinated assault at daybreak. Tallmadge was attached to Sullivan's column. Despite early success, the stubborn resistance of some Redcoats in the Chew mansion, and the professional competence of others in the British lines, finally forced the Americans to retire. The retirement turned into something of a rout. Washington, in an ineffectual attempt to prevent the retreat of his infantry, threw Tallmadge's squadron across the road.
d1e665
October 04, 1777 The Americans fell back behind Chestnut Hill. Elisha Johnson of the First Troop died in the battle.
d1e677
October 04, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pennypacker's Mill, Pennsylvania
d1e6394
October 05, 1777 Following Germantown, the army collected supplies. Some requisitioning was overzealous. Washington issued a circular to all dragoon commanders deploring the requisition of horses. During this period, some Second Dragoons drove in a British piquette and afterward brought off a mare, a filly, and two colts from a pasture a mile or more outside the enemy lines.
d1e685
October 05, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pennypacker's Mill, Pennsylvania Pennypacker's Mansion
d1e6399
October 06, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Pawlin's Mill, Pennsylvania
d1e6404
October 09, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Towamencin, Pennsylvania Frederick Wampole's
d1e6409
October 12, 1777 Stoddard sent Dorman back to Norwalk to send on some forage for the horses, possibly the very same located previously. In any event, Dorman was arrested by the civil authorities. He sent a message to his captain, requesting his presence at a trial to be held the next day before a Justice of the peace.
d1e1459
October 13, 1777 Trial of Private Gershom Dorman.
d1e1463
October 16, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Worcester, Pennsylvania Peter Wentz's
d1e6414
October 20, 1777 De Vernoux had been dismissed by Gates, and Seymour's promotion was effective. To the north, Seymour succeeded to the command of the troop with Gates. Following the British surrender at Saratoga, Gates assigned the Light Dragoons as guards to protect Burgoyne from insult, as much as for any other reason.
d1e704
October 21, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania Dawesfield (James Morris' House)
d1e6419
November 02, 1777 At the main army, another escort assignment was being pondered. John Hancock, leaving office as President of the Continental Congress, wished to return in a manner befitting his own estimate of his im- portance. He requested an escort of dragoons to accompany his carriage to Boston. After cautious debate, Washington did indulge him with twelve dragoons under Cornet Thomas Burkman of Massachusetts.
d1e732
November 04, 1777 John Adams recorded the dissatisfaction of some innkeepers when he traveled over Hancock's route. The escort angered the taverners by not paying their lodging bills.
d1e740
November 04, 1777 Yet the effect desired by Hancock was achieved. William Ellery, a Congressman from Massachusetts, met the party at Fishkill, New York, and was duly awed.
d1e749
November 04, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Whitemarsh, Pennsylvania Emlen House
d1e6425
November 14, 1777 Seymour escorted the captive general to Cambridge, and was dispatched from there to Gates with the British troop returns.
d1e712
November 14, 1777 In appreciation, Burgoyne gave Seymour a beautiful leopard skin. In later years, Seymour proudly used it as a saddle cloth for parades and other ceremonial affairs.
d1e721
November 14, 1777 The escort broke no speed records, for it did not reach Boston until November 14.
d1e756
December 04, 1777 At Whitemarsh, Washington annexed Bland's and Baylor's regiments to the right, Sullivan's wing to use small detachments to watch the enemy and prevent surpise. Moylan's and Sheldon's were to perform the same service for Greene's left wing.
d1e766
December 04, 1777 The Americans, hoping to gain another Saratoga, desired, rather than avoided battle. Two dragoons, Chaunoey and Brown of the First Troop, were killed.
d1e774
December 07, 1777 After continuing several days at Chestnut Hill, Howe took a new position opposite the American left wing at daybreak. Tallmadge's squadron was on the flank with Morgan's riflemen. They engaged the British light infantry and dragoons, but neither side gained enough advantage for a general battle.
d1e782
December 08, 1777 Howe retired to winter quarters in Philadelphia. Shortly thereafter, Washington and his forces repaired to Valley Forge. To protect the camp, Washington stationed his light troops as advanced corps of observation. Tallmadge had a detachment on this duty. His assignment was to scout from the Schuylkill to the Dela- ware, watching the enemy movements and preventing the flow of supplies to Philadelphia. The active British light horse made it neces- sary to shift station frequently. Tallmadge deemed it unsafe to permit his dragoons to unsaddle their mounts even for an hour, and he rarely stayed in one place through the night.
d1e788
December 12, 1777 General Charles Lee stopped at White's Tavern in Basking Ridge and de Vernejoux was one of the party there.
d1e406
December 12, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Swede's ford, Pennsylvania
d1e6430
December 13, 1777 During Lord Harcourt's surprise attack on the morning, de Vernejoux vigorously defended the front door and was not taken when Lee surrendered.
d1e411
December 14, 1777 Tallmadge, while near Germantown, in the evening, got word that a large body of British cavalry was approaching on the opposite bank of the Schuylkill. He immediately mounted about ten or twelve of his dragoons and formed up on the road. A noncom was sent back to hasten the rest of his men, but before he could return, the British opened fire. An exchange of a few shots followed, and Tallmadge found it impossible to oppose the more numerous Redcoats, especially after they leaped the fences and got on his flanks. He withdrew, intending to circle into the Germantown road to resume the fight. He was pursued only a short distance. The British returned to his vacated quarters in an attempt to capture the Americans cut off by the attack. All but three of those, however, were able to escape. Those captured were reportedly subjected to atrocities, particularly Quartermaster Sergeant Samuel Mills.
d1e793
December 14, 1777 While patrolling between Germantown and Philadelphia, Tallmadge met a country girl who had been sent into the city to gather intelligence on the pretext of selling eggs. On her return, she stopped at the Rising Sun Tavern, which was in sight of the British outpost, and was talking to Tallmadge when some British horse approached. He mounted swiftly, took the girl up behind him, and brought her off three miles to Germantown. Despite much pistol firing and the wild ride, she was unmoved and never complained.
d1e810
December 14, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Gulph Mill, Pennsylvania
d1e6435
December 18, 1777 De Vernejoux was commissioned in the Second Dragoons. The charges to be tried before Colonel Thomas Price's court were disobedience of orders and insult to Colonel John Stone.
d1e419
December 19, 1777 George Washington's headquarters moves to Valley Forge, Pennsylvania Deborah Hewe's House
d1e6440
December 24, 1777 In an account of a raiding party, an American surgeon, Albigence Waldo, noted the confusion caused by the similarity of the cloaks worn by the British to those of the Connecticut Light Horse, meaning probably the Second Light Dragoons. Moylan's Fourth Regiment had worn red uniforms in September 1777.
d1e821
December 26, 1777 Tallmadge returned some American deserters to Washington, notifying him that his troop would operate jointly with that of Lieutenant Lewis of Bland's Virginians, which he had encountered at Chestnut Hill.
d1e841
December 30, 1777 In an effort to reform the cavalry into a brigade on the European model, Pulaski suggested that a quartermaster general for cavalry be appointed. He nominated Blagden for the position. Although Blagden did not get the appointment, he was ordered to go to Boston to get clothes and equipment for the Regiment.
d1e851
December 30, 1777 It became evident that the cavalry could no longer operate effectively. Snow covered the ground, and most efforts of both armies were directed to surviving the winter.
d1e861
December 30, 1777 Pulaski was ordered to take his brigade into quarters at Trenton, not too far from the main army, it was hoped he could refit and reform the light horse for a better day.
d1e870

1778 SUMMER OF DISCONTENT

Date Event
January 1778 Sheldon's Horse won few honors on its first campaign. It had seen action on three fronts, but never in strength. Its contribution had often been important, but never decisive. The recently-appointed Commander of the Horse hoped to bring about change in the employment of all the American cavalry. Count Pulaski's elaborate plan for the cavalry was suited more to the Polish plains than to the American terrain. His lack of fluency in English inevitably brought misunderstanding. Personality clashes created distrust, and serious quarrels developed. Regimental commanders and officers resented the 'foreigners,' and unrest stirred the troops.
d1e895
January 1778 Coming into year 1778, the Regiment had lost three troop commanders. Captain de Vernejoux had been cashiered, while Captains Barnett and Crafts and Lieutenant Hazard had resigned. Although only ten troopers had been killed, fifty-one had either deserted or been discharged.
d1e906
January 01, 1778 Washington ordered the officer in command at Albany to issue the sabers captured at Bennington to Sheldon's regiment. These broadswords had been carried by Riedesel's Brunswick Dragoons when they marched, on foot, into the Vermont hills. Long straight weapons with double-edged blades, the German swords proved heavier than Scottish claymores and less manageable than sabers.
d1e913
January 01, 1778 Elisha Smith began in role as Stoddard's waiter or orderly which lasted eight months until he deserted.
d1e1429
January 12, 1778 The choice of the winter rendezvous was unfortunate. Tallmadge, decried the inadequacy of the cavalry quarters at Trenton.
d1e924
January 12, 1778 Stables were available for less than a fourth of the horses, and hay was virtually non-existent. Moreover, the presence of several hundred sailors in town made it necessary to billet the troops in small groups among the 'jacks'.
d1e932
January 13, 1778 Sheldon was leaving to go to Fishkill to further the refitting of the Regiment, one-third of which still lay east of the Hudson. He was also going to petition the Connecticut Assembly. He wanted the four troops raised in Connecticut declared eligible for the benefits enjoyed by the Connecticut Continental Line. Since Samuel Blagden already departed for Boston, the command, with all its headaches, fell to Tallmadge. A partial remedy of the billeting problem was attempted by moving the Regiment to Maidenhead about six miles from Trenton and quartering the men on the neighboring farms. Tallmadge believed that the whole of the cavalry could not be accommodated in that area, and he preferred returning to camp so as to permit the men to forage for themselves. As a final solution, the regiment moved to Chatham, New Jersey. (estimated date)
d1e940
February 09, 1778 Tallmadge wrote that he received 149 of the Brunswick swords. From the surrounding area he had obtained 100 pairs of leather breeches, and he had contracted for more, plus 250 pairs of boots. The table of organization at that time called for thirty sergeants and corporals, twelve farriers and trumpeters, and 204 privates.
d1e954
February 09, 1778 A return on this date, gave strength of twenty sergeants and corporals, six farriers and trumpeters, and 104 privates, about half of the planned organization.
d1e962
February 23, 1778 Tallmadge sought General Washington's advice regarding the contracted price (for breeches), which was higher than that set by Congress after the contract had been let.
d1e978
March 03, 1778 Pleased with Tallmadge's procurement activities, Washington requested that he try to get more breeches for the other regiments.
d1e971
March 10, 1778 Washington's immediate reply was to honor the bargained rate.
d1e986
March 20, 1778 Washington had been forced to conclude that Pulaski had no alternative but to resign. Washington designated Colonel Moylan as commander, but he neither promoted him nor removed him from command of his own regiment.
d1e997
April 15, 1778 For some time in April, Tallmadge was absent from Chatham, being then with the troops that had been with Gates at Saratoga and Putnam in the Hudson Highlands. While he was gone, Moylan, as the senior cavalry officer, inspected the troops at Chatham and found them ill-prepared for the coming campaign. His report to Washington inspired a blistering letter to 'the Officer Commanding the Second Continental Dragoons.' The General sternly reproved the Regiment's officers for laxity in caring for the mounts.
d1e1007
May 02, 1778 On resigning, as Commander of the Horse, Pulaski was authorized to raise an independent legion of horse and foot. He had re- quested that Washington allow him to draft four men from each of the cavalry regiments to serve as a nucleus of the new organization. He was permitted to enlist only two troopers from each regiment, plus one sergeant from Sheldon's Horse. The quota for the Second Dragoons all came from the First Troop. Corporal Joseph Cone may have transferred as a step towards promotion. Why Privates Nathan Fenton and Joseph Weeks made the move is less apparent.
d1e1036
May 03, 1778 Tallmadge, on his return to Chatham, responded in an aggrieved but polite manner, citing the many problems of forage, arms, and saddlery, with which he and the other officers were trying to cope.
d1e1015
May 12-, 1778 After a visit from Sheldon, Washington replied to Tallmadge, and, in a somewhat mollifying tone, explained his reasons for the scorching reprimand, when he sternly reproved the Regiment's officers for laxity in caring for the mounts.
d1e1026
May 14, 1778 Mid-May found the Regiment in its not-unusual, dispersed state. Sheldon was absent once more, east of the Hudson, possibly at Hartford where, on May 14, the Assembly approved his petition to get his Connecticut Dragoons the same benefits granted the men of the Connecticut Line.
d1e1049
May 29, 1778 Washington ordered the Regiment to join Gates at Fishkill, New York.
d1e1068
June 01, 1778 Although American intelligence predicted that Sir Henry Clinton would soon evacuate Philadelphia, the extent of the country under Gates required mobile troops to patrol it and to counter any movement from New York. Tallmadge received the order, and he immediately notified Gates that he was preparing to join his command. He recalled the several detachments on the lines to rendezvous at Newburgh, and he wrote Sheldon to inform him of the order. The prospect of seeing the entire Regiment united, something that had not occurred since its raising, pleased the young major greatly.
d1e1075
June 02, 1778 With Blagden still absent, the command of the Regiment at Chatham fell to Tallmadge. His command was somewhat abbreviated. Frequent drafts for special duty left only a few men fit for general service, and even those were short of arms and accoutrement. Special duty assginments often had a pleasing aspect. Captain Stoddard, while on one of these, got to visit the charming young Quaker, Sally Wister. Her journal noted that he was escorting a wagon when he stopped at her house in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.
d1e1056
June 03, 1778 After some delay in getting horses and wagons fitted and waiting out an easterly storm, Tallmadge began to march. The reception given Colonel Sheldon by Gates was not exactly warm. In a fit of pique, the General apparently let off steam by abusive language, damning Sheldon, and calling him neither an officer nor a gentleman. Sheldon retained his self-control, only telling Lieutenant Jedidiah Rogers, one of his subalterns, that as soon as Washington arrived he would call Gates to account. After cooling off. Gates recalled Sheldon and Blagden, and, in the presence of his aide, Colonel Troup, made his apologies.
d1e1088
June 03, 1778 Washington was, of course, delayed by the action at Monmouth Court House. Had he retained Sheldon's Horse in New Jersey, it is entirely possible that their harassment of Clinton's march might have resulted in a more decisive outcome of that encounter. (estimated date)
d1e1097
June 17, 1778 Instead of the opportunity for more a decisive outcome in New Jersey with Clinton, the Regiment was deployed by Gates to posts in Westchester. From his station at King Street, Sheldon, sent an officer to the Saw Pits to determine whether the Connecticut militia foot and horse called to active service for the summer had yet arrived.
d1e1107
June 20, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Doylestown, Pennsylvania
d1e6445
June 21, 1778 Stoddard dispatched a squad to take into custody a Tory, Israel Underbill, accused of espionage and dealing in contraband. They took not only Underbill, but also large quantities of sugar and other supplies found at his house as well. In his report to Gates, Stoddard mentioned rumors that attributed excessive zeal to his treatment of other Tories and suspected persons.
d1e1115
June 22, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Coryell's Ferry, New Jersey Holcombe House
d1e6450
June 23, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Hopewell, New Jersey John Hunt's
d1e6456
June 25, 1778 Sheldon reported to Gates, that he had posted parties from Rye to Dobbs Ferry, and that he had ordered cavalry patrols for night duty.
d1e1131
June 26, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Cranberry, New Jersey
d1e6461
June 27, 1778 Two days after Sheldon posted parties from Rye to Dobbs Ferry, a sergeant and four men from Tallmadge's detachment, while escorting a Tory near Philipse Manor, were fired upon by a British galley on the Hudson. Suspecting that some of the ship's officers and men might be in the house, the sergeant sent word to Tallmadge, who immediately moved with a party of eighteen horse and thirty foot to effect a search of the house.
d1e1136
June 27, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Englishtown, New Jersey
d1e6466
June 28, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Middlesex County, New Jersey
d1e6471
June 29, 1778 By the time the party of eighteen horse and thirty foot arrived, the galley had sailed farther north, but the troop found that the enemy had been ashore. After searching the property (Philipse Manor), Tallmadge confiscated some cordage to be made into halters for his mounts.
d1e1143
June 29, 1778 In Major Tallmadge's report to Gates, the major mentioned that he had received twelve horses for his dismounted men. Per Washington's directive, he had purchased the animals on credit, and he now sought instruction on method of payment. He also wished permission to recruit Continental dragoons from the short-term troops brought on for the summer campaign. (date estimated)
d1e1152
June 29, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Near Monmouth, New Jersey
d1e6476
July 03, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Brunswick, New Jersey
d1e6481
July 09, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Newark, New Jersey
d1e6487
July 10, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Paramus, New Jersey The Hermitage (Ms. Theodosia Prevost's)
d1e6492
July 15, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Haverstraw, New York (visit to West Point on16 July) Udny Hay's
d1e6497
July 19, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to 7 miles from King's Ferry, New York Captain Drake's Delavan House
d1e6502
July 20, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to White Plains, New York Elijah Miller's House/Reuben Wright's Mill
d1e6507
September 17, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fredericksburg, New York
d1e6512
October 01, 1778 Elisha Smith was sentenced to death for deserting, after service with Captain Stoddard as orderly, which lasted eight months He was charged with desertion and with aiding the enemy by guiding them in an attack on the Americans. Tried by a court of which Blagden as president, Washington immediately approved the sentence.
d1e1433
October 01, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fishkill, New York Brinkerhoff's House
d1e6518
October 09, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fredericksburg, New York
d1e6523
October 13, 1778 Stoddard obtained an order from Scott to procure the release of his trooper, and, with four dragoons, he made haste to Norwalk. Arriving just as the trial was getting under way, Stoddard and his men, over the objections of the litigants, and by a display of weapons, forcibly removed Dorman from the custody of the constable. On the complaint of the Norwalk officials, Washington ordered the private's return to their custody and directed Scott to send Stoddard to headquarters to explain his actions.
d1e1471
October 14, 1778 As for poor Elisha Smith, Washington responded to Stoddard's appeal by expressing regret that he was unable to pardon the convicted deserter.
d1e1479
October 15, 1778 Captain Stoddard petitioned Washington for clemency regarding Elisha Smith's death sentence, citing Smith's youth and previous good service. It was an unpropitious time for Stoddard to intercede, for Washington was dealing with another incident involving Stoddard and his men. Civil officials from Norwalk, Connecticut had presented a complaint against Stoddard that very day. Relations between Stoddard's troopers and some citizens of Norwalk had been severely strained during the proceeding weeks. Corporal David Hamilton and Private Gershom Dorman had been foraging in the area earlier and had forced their way into the barn of a Mr. Comstock to determine whether he had any corn which could be requisitioned for the cavalry. The corporal said that he would not take any corn without permission, but the aggrieved citizens resented the use of arms to make an unwarranted search.
d1e1441
October 21, 1778 Stoddard's deposition explaining the Dorman incident and a contradicting document by James Lockwood, a witness, were submitted to the Commander-in-Chief. Of eighteen company officers then on duty, fourteen signed the document, indicating a general feeling of dissatisfaction in the Regiment. Despite the shocking charges and forthright language of the document, Sheldon made no immediate move to act on it. Keeping his own counsel, he apparently informed no one, neither on his staff nor in higher authority, quietly riding out the most threatening storm he had yet encountered.
d1e1500
October 21, 1778 The outcome of the Stoddard deposition so rankled Stoddard that he then instigated a most serious threat to Sheldon's authority. Stoddard composed a list of charges and grievances that, in unequivocal language, blamed the Colonel for all the troubles of the regiment which he described as a once-respected organization, now transformed to a banditti of refugees from the justice of their country and the halter. He accused his commander of indolence in procuring horses, of failing to establish his influence at headquarters, and of meanly giving up the fairest pretensions to rank in the army. The colonel was, according to Stoddard's screed, indolent, ignorant, capricious, and disinterested in the welfare of his men. In a final burst of rhetoric, the petition most earnestly requested the colonel to retire from command.
d1e1507
October 21, 1778 Beginning of Culper Spy Ring: Talmadge opened a private correspondence with some persons in New York, which continued through out the American Revolution. It became one of the most successful American espionage operations. It involved a whaleboat link across Long Island Sound with Culper Spy Ring member, Caleb Brewster, based in Black Rock, Connecticut, who picked up spy letters from a courier who travelled the 55 miles by horseback to and from the New York city. So carefully was it conducted that the British never learned the identity of the agent in place. In fact, it was only by accident by that all the spy names were revealed, when a chest with correspondence was discovered and historian Morton Pennypacker made the connection, 160 years later.
d1e1533
November 02, 1778 Tallmadge and John Webb went in on a flag as far as Valentine's Hill. While Webb went on to meet his brother, a prisoner of war in New York, Talmadge remained at the outpost. There, he got the impression that his enemy counterparts wished for an accommodation with the Americans to join forces against the French. Although French repute after Newport was not high in the American forces, Tallmadge disabused the Redcoats of any hope for simple reconciliation.
d1e1545
November 10, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Poughkeepsie, New York Glebe House
d1e6528
November 11, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fredericksburg, New York
d1e6533
November 16, 1778 Elisha Smith came to his unhappy end. He was not the last of the Second Dragoons to be hanged for desertion, for in later campaigns, three more unfortunates were to suffer the same.
d1e1556
November 29, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fishkill, New York
d1e6538
December 02, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Elizabethtown, New Jersey
d1e6543
December 06, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Paramus, New Jersey
d1e6549
December 11, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Middlebrook, New Jersey
d1e6554
December 23, 1778 George Washington's headquarters moves to Philadelphia Guest of Henry Laurens
d1e6559
December 26, 1778 Orders to move to winter quarters were sent by Washington. The site chosen was Durham, Connecticut, about twenty miles south of Wethersfield. Strict instructions had been included in Washington's directive of November 26. The horses Were to be especially cared for. Neither officer nor trooper was to use them on personal business, and every precaution was to be taken to bring them into the field next spring in the best possible condition.
d1e1564
December 31, 1778 The second campaign ended for Sheldon's Horse. Many of the mistakes in employing cavalry on the first campaign had been repeated. High hopes had seen low realization. Furthermore, a serious orale problem had not been resolved, but was left to fester and to cause more trouble in the spring to come.
d1e1585

1779 CHALLENGE CONTAINED

Date Event
January 01, 1779 The Colonel took advantage of his proximity to Hartford to petition the Assembly for blankets, clothing, and other necessities on the same basis as the Connecticut Line. The appeal was denied.
d1e1602
January 02, 1779 Tallmadge busied himself with his intelligence chain from New York, a duty which took him often to Greenfield near the Sound. From there he could slip over to Long Island to confer with the agent known as Samuel Culper, Senior. In Philadelphia, Washington advised that he had no new instructions for Culper, and he directed the Major to use the regular express service from Danbury to headquarters at Middlebrook in New Jersey.
d1e1612
January 08, 1779 Washington ordered Sheldon to furnish a non-commissioned officer and six dragoons to General Putnam. This detail was to be relieved as often as Sheldon saw fit.
d1e1622
January 29, 1779 Captain Stoddard requested extended leave to go to France for his health. With his request was his physician's certificate recommending such action. Washington referred it to Congress, stating that he did not think he was authorized to grant permission for an officer to leave the country. Congress approved the request the same day, and on January, 29 Lieutenant Colonel John Laurens sent the order to Stoddard.
d1e1636
February 05, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to Middlebrook, New Jersey Wallace House
d1e6564
February 14, 1779 In mid-February, all three field officers were absent from the regiment. Tallmadge was in Boston, while Blagden was at Hartford. In a letter to Tallmadge, Blagden related that Stoddard had obtained leave to go to France and that Sheldon had gone home for the present. He underlined the phrase for the present and stated further that he, Blagden, was going to Durham, where he hoped something would be concluded for the general good. He apparently had some knowledge of Stoddard's petition and expected Sheldon to take some action regarding all three field officers were absent from the regiment. Tallmadge was in Boston, while Blagden was at Hartford. In a letter to Tallmadge, Blagden related that Stoddard had obtained leave to go to France and that Sheldon had gone home for the present. He underlined the phrase for the present and stated further that he, Blagden, was going to Durham, where he hoped something would be concluded for the general good. He apparently had some knowledge of Stoddard's petition and expected Sheldon to take some action regarding Tallmadge's spy ring kept on working.
d1e1646
February 26, 1779 Caleb Brewster, his whaleboat commander, and Samuel Culper each forwarded information regarding the British on Long Island. The intelligence net functioned quite well with its coordinator absent. During a second absence in March, reports continued to come in from Culper. Tallmadge was off in Philadelphia on this trip and quite disgusted with conditions he found in the capital. During Tallmadge's absence, a recently-joined cornet, Sylvanus Dickinson, served as the spy ring coordinator.
d1e1656
March 20, 1779 In a letter from Raritan, New Jersey, he expressed his low opinion of congressmen who were too involved in trivial affairs to act on weightier military matters.
d1e1667
March 21, 1779 He forwarded reports from Culper. So enamoured of his work was Dickinson that he expressed the wish to be stationed at Fairfield in order to continue it.
d1e1676
March 22, 1779 Washington gives Tallmadge fifty guineas for Culper and requested that he seek a faster route for the flow of intelligence.(Estimated date, being investigated)
d1e1684
May 13, 1779 The Connecticut Assembly, which began monthlong session, ordered a draft of 150 men of the Connecticut Light Horse to serve with Sheldon's Regiment or in the state-raised foot battalions until January 15, 1780
d1e1697
May 13, 1779 The Connecticut Assembly resolution to allow the light dragoons and artillery all privileges given the Connecticut Line was passed (Estimated date, need date resolution passed)
d1e1704
May 13, 1779 An act to outlaw dueling was passed by the Connecticut Assembly. This would have legally prevented a duel from occurring due to a quarrel between Josiah Stoddard and William Nichols of Hartford, regarding Stoddard's conduct on an expedition to Skenesborough in May 1775, though records have not yet indicated such a duel took place. (estimated date, need date resolution passed)
d1e1714
May 16, 1779 Sheldon sent Stoddard a certificate of settled accounts.
d1e1730
May 23, 1779 Doctor Darius Stoddard bore a letter from his brother to Washington.
d1e1735
May 29, 1779 A warning order on put the Regiment on alert to take the field on a moment's notice.
d1e1745
May 31, 1779 Washington followed with marching orders. Sheldon's Horse was directed to the North River posts under General Alexander McDougall who had succeeded to Putnam's command. The orders were prompted by the opening of the 1779 campaign. Sir Henry Clinton's troops had marched to White Plains and threatened West Point, the key to the American defenses in the Hudson Highlands.
d1e1749
May 31, 1779 Combined British land and naval forces seized both Stony Point and Verplanck's Point.
d1e1765
June 05, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to Ringwood, New Jersey Robert Erskine's Iron Works
d1e6569
June 07, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to Smith's Clove, New York Near the Tavern
d1e6574
June 15, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Windsor, New York William Ellison's
d1e6580
July 21, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to West Point, New York Moore House
d1e6585
December 01, 1779 George Washington's headquarters moves to Morristown, New Jersey Ford Mansion
d1e6590

1780 TIME OF TRIAL

Date Event
June 11, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Passaic County, New Jersey Dey Mansion
d1e6595
August 06, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Peekskill, New York
d1e6600
August 07, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Clarkstown, New York
d1e6605
August 08, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Orangetown, New York
d1e6611
August 19, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Vicinity of Fort Lee, New Jersey
d1e6616
August 25, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Vicinity of Hackensack, New Jersey Zabriskie's at River Edge
d1e6621
August 31, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Near Fort Lee, New Jersey
d1e6626
September 03, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Englewood, New Jersey Liberty Pole Tavern
d1e6631
September 04, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Kendekemack, New Jersey
d1e6636
September 17, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Bridge, New Jersey Joshua Hett Smith's
d1e6642
September 20, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Hartford, Connecticut
d1e6647
September 23, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Litchfield, Connecticut Oliver Wolcott's
d1e6652
September 24, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fishkill, New York Wharton's
d1e6657
September 25, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to West Point, New York
d1e6662
September 28, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Tappan, New York De Windt House
d1e6667
October 08, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to Passaic County, New Jersey Dey Mansion
d1e6673
October 31, 1780 Sheldon not guilty of any charge.
d1e3498
November 28, 1780 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Windsor, New York William Ellison's
d1e6678

1781 NOT IN ON THE KILL

Date Event
March 06, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Newport, Rhode Island Vernon House
d1e6683
March 14, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Providence, Rhode Island Jabez Brown's
d1e6688
March 20, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Windsor, New York William Ellison's
d1e6693
May 18, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to 43 miles from Fishkill, New York Morgan's Tavern
d1e6698
May 19, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Wethersfield, Connecticut Webb House
d1e6704
May 25, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Windsor, New York William Ellison's
d1e6709
June 14, 1781 test
d1e3878
June 24, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Peekskill, New York
d1e6714
July 01, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Valentine's Hill, New York
d1e6719
July 06, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Dobb's ferry, New York
d1e6724
July 18, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to North end of York Island, New York
d1e6729
July 23, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to York Island, New York Van Courtlandt Mansion
d1e6735
July 25, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to near Dobb's Ferry, New York
d1e6740
August 20, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Haverstraw, New York Udny Hay's
d1e6745
August 21, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to King's Ferry, New York
d1e6750
August 24, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Haverstraw, New York
d1e6755
August 25, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to King's Ferry, New York
d1e6760
August 26, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Ramapo, New Jersey
d1e6766
August 27, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Chatham, New Jersey
d1e6771
August 29, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Brunswick & Trenton, New Jersey
d1e6776
August 31, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Philadelphia Robert Morris's
d1e6781
September 08, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Baltimore Fountain Inn
d1e6786
September 09, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Mount Vernon13 September
d1e6791
September 13, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fredericksburg
d1e6797
September 14, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Williamsburg Wythe House
d1e6802
October 06, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Outside Yorktown
d1e6807
October 20, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Yorktown & Williamsburg
d1e6812
November 07, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Eltham, Virginia Burwell Bassett's
d1e6817
November 12, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fredericksburg
d1e6822
November 13, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Mount Vernon
d1e6828
November 26, 1781 George Washington's headquarters moves to Philadelphia Benjamin Chew's Town House
d1e6833

1782 THE LAST CAMPAIGN

Date Event
February 07, 1782 test
d1e4615
April 01, 1782 George Washington's headquarters moves to New Burgh, New York Hasbrouck House
d1e6838

1783 NOT WITH A BANG

Date Event
January 11, 1783 test
d1e5317
August 01, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to Rocky Hill, New Jersey Rockingham
d1e6843
November 20, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to West Point, New York
d1e6848
November 22, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to Harlem Heights, New York Blue Bell Tavern
d1e6853
November 24, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to Harlem Heights, New York Day's Tavern or Leggett's Tavern
d1e6859
November 25, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to New York City Bull's Head Tavern
d1e6864
December 04, 1783 George Washington's headquarters moves to Fraunces' Tavern
d1e6869